Category: Print

Make That Money Smartly

Maybe it’s the Think and Grow Rich calendar I have on my desk. Maybe it’s the focus of my just-published book. But money seems to motivate me. Economic considerations aren’t the only reason I write — I like to think my work makes some contribution to my readers’ lives — but monetary compensation validates me, and I think I’m not alone.

What about you? Would you like to earn more money from your writing this year? (Or, perhaps, earn some money from your writing!) It doesn’t matter whether you’re a full-time, part-time, or whenever-you-can-grab-a-minute-time writer, you can apply these strategies to make more money from your writing–even double what you earned last year. Heck, would you like to start a business? This site has a regional breakdown of the best small business opportunities in your area.

But first, you must have a goal.

Even one as simple as “I want to double my writing income. ” Or, “I want to …

Unauthorized Biographies: Could YOU Write One?

If everyone told the truth and nothing but the truth, writing biographies would be easy. Just talk to the right people, write up what they say and — voila! — you’d have the story of a life. But human nature being what it is, people would rather present themselves and their loved ones in the best possible light than share embarrassing or painful incidents from the past.

That’s why biographer Carol Felsenthal doesn’t mind when subjects like Katharine Graham, the legendary publisher of The Washington Post, flatly refuse to cooperate with her. “I have no desire to write an authorized biography,” she declares.

Felsenthal prefers telling the whole story — warts and all. Her research into the life of Katharine Graham, for example, unearthed a great deal of information that Graham and her family were apparently quite upset to see in print.

Much of Felsenthal’s bestselling biography, Power, Privilege and the Post: The Katharine Graham Story (Putnam), focuses on …

Reviewing A Life Of Design

As assistant for six years to Dr. M. F. Agha, the legendary art director of Vogue and Vanity Fair, Cipe Pineles learned the techniques of magazine design just as the field was reinventing itself. Deploying ideas from European design within the capricious world of New York publishing, Agha was forging new attitudes toward photography, typography, and layout, and Pineles was at his side throughout his experimentation. Acting as mentor and collaborator, Agha often shared credit with Pineles for his professional awards, and he gave her considerable autonomy, assigning her to design two covers for Vogue and one for Vanity Fair, among other significant projects.

oldvanityIn 1942 Pineles became art director of Glamour, a Conde Nast publication aimed at younger women, and the loose, popular style she crafted for it kept links to modernist principles of structure and abstraction while using images and type playfully. Her openhearted brand of modernism continued to evolve in her work as art director of Seventeen

Tobacco Ads Continue Their Descent Into Nothingness

Not to be outdone, Brown & Williamson weighs in with its Lucky Strike “American Original” campaign from Bates, peppered with pouty hipsters in standard-issue greasy hair, leather jackets, and Skechers, looking about as friendly as Osama bin Laden’s bodyguards.

But the focal point for this work is in Philly, where those rogues at Gyro Worldwide’s oeuvre for Red Kamel and Kamel Menthe has proved the most outrageous cigarette advertising in years. Everything from classic ’40s pinups to staged movie tableaux to ’70s cop shows have helped create a brand image that’s sophisticated, media-hip, and damned appealing. Even might make you want to, well, hell – just go grab a pack and light up!

camelsexThe irony, of course, is that this work has begun to get interesting just when its future is in jeopardy. While the industry dodged Draconian restrictions on ad content when last year’s big tobacco settlement fell apart, some observers feel it’s only a matter of time before